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20121202
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john boehner. the reason they're here and want their voices heard if, indeed, this worst-case scenario happens, this fiscal cliff as we've been calling it, it will impact their state's economies. according to the ppew report, these states rely on federal money. things like education would be impacted. they're here to put pressure not only on the president but lawmakers up on the hill to get this deal done. >> takes place in about an hour. dan loathian, reporting from th white house. >>> nearly 15 million households rely on food stamps. republicans say it's far too many. it's government assistance out of control. certainly a major theme during the republican primary. >> president obama has been historically the most effective food stamp president in american histor history. >> in light of the continuing controversy over food stamps, new jersey democratic mayor cory book booker will live on food stamps saying, quote, nutrition is not a responsibility of the government. >> as you mentioned this all sort of began as a back and forth on twitter. we'll get to that in detail in a moment. firs
speaker john boehner did not say that is drawing attention tonight. when questioned by reporters yesterday, boehner would not comment on whether there is room for compromise on the president's demand for higher tax rates, on high income americans. boehner and the president spoke by phone this week, but in public comments, appear to have no -- made no progress. >>> same sex couples are finally getting their day in court. this time, the u.s. supreme court. justices have decided to hear two constitutional challenges to federal and state laws. one case involves the federal defense of marriage act, which denies federal benefits to same sex couples legally married in their own state. the other is a challenge to california's prop 8, which took away the right of same sex marriage that had been previously approved by state courts. >>> florida governor charlie crist completed his political transformation. crist was elected governor as a republican in 2006, then later ran for the senate as an independent. he campaigned for president obama, and spoke at the democratic national convention. he's now off
to avoid the fiscal cliff. but republican house speaker john boehner dismisses it as, and i'm quoting, la la land. the republicans offered their proposal, that happened about 24 hours ago. the white house quickly labels it as nothing new. business as usual, right? so how do we move beyond this stalemate in washington? we heard from the president, just a short time ago. our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin joins me now, jessica, the president spoke out, sat down in an interview with bloomberg tv, and in listening to the interview, did you hear any clues toward a possible compromise here? >> reporter: not new clues, brooke. the president laid down the marker that we heard from the white house consistently, which is they aren't moving until they hear the republicans agree to raise tax rates on the wealthiest. listen to what the president had to say. >> i think that, you know, we have the potential of getting a deal done, but it is going to require what i talked about during the campaign, which is a balanced responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses
boehner, you know, mitch mcconnell, for their sort of volley back? >> reporter: hi, brooke. well, they're saying ready anytime. the clock is ticking and it's ball's in the republicans' court. here is what jay carney had to say a few minutes ago. listen to this. >> making vague promises about achieving revenue through capping deductions or closing loopholes, simply doesn't add up to a serious proposal. we haven't heard which deductions they would cap or which loopholes they would close. >> so that's the white house's position. now, they are waiting to hear about what the republicans would do, what kind of detailed proposal they would offer. the republicans, brooke, for their part are insistent they want to hear about the president's willingness to do entitlements. how much more they would do to cut spending and whether the white house would be willing to scale back on some of those extra spending measures, more dollars the president wants the government to put out next year, that were in some of secretary geithner's proposal last week, brooke. >> let's go back over that so everyone is o
he's got an obligation to send one to the congress. >> so that was speaker boehner obviously flanked by republicans. we'll get you that sound bite from the president because i want to make sure you hear both sides. here is the question i'm hearing people ask. if we go off the cliff here, how big of a hit will we take on taxs? stand by because i'm good to give you the closest answer i possibly can. to help me with that is laurie montgomery, the fiscal policy reporter for the washington post. so, laurie, welcome to you here. and your paper this morning, you ran through a couple of tax scenarios which were pretty palletable so we want to show our view whaeers what you ran through. let me run through two. we'll look at this first one. so everybody take a look at this graphic. this is scenario number one, married couple, two kids, one in college, combined income of $137,000. you see the numbers here first under the democrats' plan, passed by the senate, not by the house, they would see their taxes rise 2500 bucks a year. just below that, the republican plan, passed by the house in august,
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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